Acro & Parachute Use

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Section 91.303: Aerobatic flight.

Aerobatic plane flying a Vertical Flight Upline

photo: Proaerobusiness.com

No person may operate an aircraft in aerobatic flight --

  (a) Over any congested area of a city, town, or settlement;

  (b) Over an open air assembly of persons;

  (c) Within the lateral boundaries of the surface areas of Class B, Class C,

    Class D, or Class E airspace designated for an airport;

  (d) Within 4 nautical miles of the center line of any Federal airway;

  (e) Below an altitude of 1,500 feet above the surface; or

  (f) When flight visibility is less than 3 statute miles.

 

For the purposes of this section, aerobatic flight means an intentional maneuver involving an abrupt change in an aircraft's attitude, an abnormal attitude, or abnormal acceleration, not necessary for normal flight.

 

Section 91.307: Parachutes and parachuting.

  a) No pilot of a civil aircraft may allow a parachute that is available for

   emergency use to be carried in that aircraft unless it is an approved

   type and –

   1) If a chair type (canopy in back), it has been packed by a certificated and

       appropriately rated parachute rigger within the preceding 120 days; or

   2) If any other type, it has been packed by a certificated and appropriately

       rated parachute rigger --

          (i) Within the preceding 120 days, if its canopy, shrouds, and harness

              are composed exclusively of nylon, rayon, or other similar synthetic

              fiber or materials that are substantially resistant to damage from

              mold, mildew, or other fungi and other rotting agents propagated

              in a moist environment; or

         (ii) Within the preceding 60 days, if any part of the parachute is

              composed of silk, pongee, or other natural fiber, or materials not

              specified in paragraph of this section.

  1.   b) Except in an emergency, no pilot in command may allow, and no person may

   conduct, a parachute operation from an aircraft within the United States

   except in accordance with part 105 of this chapter.

  1.   c) Unless each occupant of the aircraft is wearing an approved parachute, no

   pilot of a civil aircraft carrying any person (other than a crewmember) may

   execute any intentional maneuver that exceeds --

   (1) A bank of 60 degrees relative to the horizon; or

   (2) A nose-up or nose-down attitude of 30 degrees relative to the horizon.

  1.   d) Paragraph (c) of this section does not apply to --

   (1) Flight tests for pilot certification or rating; or

   (2) Spins and other flight maneuvers required by the regulations for any

        certificate or rating when given by --

        (i) A certificated flight instructor; or

        (ii) An airline transport pilot instructing in accordance with §61.67 of this

            chapter.

  1.   e) For the purposes of this section, approved parachute means --

  (1) A parachute manufactured under a type certificate or a technical standard

       order (C-23 series); or

  (2) A personnel-carrying military parachute identified by an NAF, AAF, or AN

       drawing number, an AAF order number, or any other military designation

       or specification number.