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Aviation Short Takes

Short Takes - Commetary

Pertinent Comments about current events

 

Aviation Short Takes is designed as a comment area. The opinions about important aviation matters developing today can be read here.

The articles will find a home here temporarily; and depending upon the long-term relevance, the commentary may subsequently be republished on our INFO WAREHOUSE pages.  Do you have relevant comments concerning Airspace Design and/or Aviation Safety that you feel others can benefit from?  For instance, do you have a recommendation for us to link to?  Please let me know!  Use scauwg@earthlink.net and address your input to Ron Berinstein, webmaster. IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER: Opinions and views expressed in the following commentary are those of the authors &/or publishers alone; and may or may not reflect SCAUWG.ORG or SCAUWG.

This page was added on 05/14/2022.  It is PAGE 3.  To view prior commentary please see "Short Takes" and "Short Takes Page 2."

 

Let's Begin:

Subject: Proposed update to the Fly a Friendly Pattern Program    - Posted 5/14/2014  7 PM   (After the LBAA Meeting held 5/14 at 1:30 PM)  Planned is more reporting on this subject.
The following is a proposal of changes to the Fly a Friendly pattern Program at KLGB. To be discussed.   This was sent out on April 2, 2024. I'm am forwarding it to SCAUWG.ORG for informational purposes.
 
Fly A Friendly Pattern Program proposed changes.

Black font, no changes
Blue font , old verbiage to be removed or changed
Red font, proposed changes, additions
________________________________________________________________

Fly A Friendly Pattern Program

These procedures are voluntary, and not mandatory. Do not attempt to follow any of these voluntary noise abatement procedures if any procedure compromises safety and performance of your aircraft.

Use full length of Runway, and full power on all departures.

Use Best Efforts to Maximize Climb after takeoff.

Fly appropriate pattern altitudes.

OLD
When able, implement crosswind turns at 500’ MSL on departure.

NEW (1)

When able, implement crosswind turns at the highest altitude possible on departure using 700’ as a reference altitude.
You may request an early crosswind turn from the tower at a lower altitude if desired and safe.

Fly the upwind leg to 1000’ MSL on departure before turning crosswind/downwind, depending on ATC instructions.
Limit the width of the downwind leg to no more than ½ to one mile from runway centerlines of Runway 08L/26R and Runway 08R/26L use visual cues
Aligning Downwind to Carson St., to north on Runway 08L/26R
Aligning Downwind to Willow St. to the south on Runway 08R/26L

(2) MOVED UP FROM BOTTOM
Aircraft should try to touch down in normal touchdown zone to
maximize the usable distance of the runway with appropriate
flight profiles. (2) If a touch and go is attempted, and the landing is made further down the runway, please use full stop taxi back procedures to minimize noise.

Distribute flight activity based on demand and optimize the use of
both 26L and 26R as the prevailing runways to best avoid residential
areas. (3) This is dependent on ATC instructions/ operations.

Adhere to all Long Beach Municipal Code (LBMC) Chapter 16.43
(Airport Noise Ordinance) regulations and Long Beach Airport
recommended noise abatement procedures related to pattern
and flight training:

OLD
Reminder – Touch and Go operations are not permitted after 7 pm
weekly and 3 pm on the weekends and Holidays.

NEW (4)
Touch and Go, Stop and Go, Practice Low Approach, and VFR Practice
Missed Approach can be conducted at the Airport between 7am and 7pm on weekdays and between 8am and 3pm on Saturdays, Sundays, New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. If any such holiday falls on Saturday or Sunday and, as a result, a holiday is observed on the preceding Friday or succeeding Monday, then such Friday or Monday, as the case may be, shall be considered to be a holiday for that purpose.

As a recommendation- No pattern work on any runway after
10 pm- including required full stop and taxi back operations.

(5)
For any pattern work necessary after 10 pm, use a right hand pattern
on the only active runway (30/12) so to mitigate impacts to residential

neighborhoods
(6)
If a departure is required after 10pm, VFR departures should contain their climb to climbing turns, gaining as much altitude as possible within the confines of the airport property to reduce noise in the neighborhoods.
______________________________________________________________
 
Notes:
These procedures are voluntary, and not mandatory. Do not attempt to follow any of these voluntary noise abatement procedures if any procedure compromises safety and performance of your aircraft.
This disclaimer has to be placed everywhere it can be viewed.
(1).  When able, implement crosswind turns at the highest altitude possible on departure, using 700’ as a reference. You may request an early crosswind turn from the tower at a lower altitude if desired and safe.
This clarification is to coincide with the established procedures in the AIM regarding the correct altitude to turn from upwind to crosswind. It states the correct altitude to turn is 300 feet below pattern altitude. The pattern altitude for KLGB is 1000 feet AGL. If the highest altitude being 700 feet, any altitude close to 700 feet will suffice. You may ask for a non normal early turn prior to 700 feet (500 feet), and the airport boundary if ATC approves this.

(2). This statement was moved up from the bottom to create the orderly continuity from “takeoff to landing”.

If a touch and go is attempted, and the landing is made further down the runway, please use full stop taxi back procedures to minimize noise.

This addresses the go/ no go decision to perform a full stop taxi back instead of creating a noise issue at lower altitude due to departing the runway further down. Based on sound decision making.

(3). This is dependent on ATC instructions/ operations.

ATC has the final word on traffic distribution. You may request a different runway to distribute the traffic, but it is ATC’s final word if it will be available.

(4). Touch and Go, Stop and Go, Practice Low Approach, and VFR Practice
Missed Approach can be conducted at the Airport between 7am and 7pm on weekdays and between 8am and 3pm on Saturdays, Sundays, New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. If any such holiday falls on Saturday or Sunday and, as a result, a holiday is observed on the preceding Friday or succeeding Monday, then such Friday or Monday, as the case may be, shall be considered to be a holiday for that purpose. (This can be simplified as needed for clarity.)

This verbiage was taken from the KLGB airport noise ordinance
16.43.030, A. Prohibited activities.

A. Training Operations. No Touch and Go, Stop and Go, Practice Low Approach, or VFR Practice Missed Approach shall be conducted at the Airport except between seven a.m. and seven p.m. on weekdays and between eight a.m. and three p.m. on Saturdays, Sundays, New Year’s Day,

Memorial Day, Independence Day, Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day; provided, however, that if any such holiday falls on Saturday or Sunday and, as a result, a holiday is observed on the preceding Friday or succeeding Monday, then such Friday or Monday, as the case may be, shall be considered to be a holiday for purposes of this Section. Except for instrument training, Training Operations shall be conducted only on Runways 25R/7L and 25L/7R, unless the FAA directs such Operations on Runways 34L/16R and 34R/16L.
 
We need to discuss removing and updating the runway identifiers in the ordinance and all other communications.

(5). “As a recommendation- No pattern work on any runway after
10 pm- including required full stop and taxi back operations.”

For any pattern work necessary after 10 pm, use a right hand pattern
on the only active runway (30/12) so to mitigate impacts to residential
Neighborhoods.

When is pattern work deemed necessary after 10 pm In the above statement (5)?

“As a recommendation- No pattern work on any runway after 10 pm- including required full stop and taxi back operations.”

Doesn’t this contradict the “No pattern work on any runway after 10 pm- including required full stop and taxi back operations.”?

I suggest removing the statement mentioning any pattern work, right hand or left hand, necessary after 10 pm. It gives the impression that this is okay. If this is allowed, it will generate noise complaints.
(6) Added for discussion
If a departure is required before 7am and after 10pm, VFR departures should contain their climb to climbing turns, gaining as much altitude as possible within the confines of the airport property to reduce noise in the neighborhoods.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++=

As seen currently on the website

Use full length of Runway, and full power on departure.

Use Best Efforts to Maximize Climb on departure.

Fly appropriate pattern altitudes.
When able, implement crosswind turns at 500’ MSL on departure.
Otherwise fly the upwind leg to 1000’ MSL on departure before
turning crosswind/downwind.

Limit the width of the downwind leg to no more than ½ to one mile
from runway centerlines of Runway 08L/26R and
Runway 08R/26L use visual cues

Aligning Downwind to Carson St., to north on

Runway 08L/26R
Aligning Downwind to Willow St. to the south on
Runway 08R/26L

Distribute flight activity based on demand and optimize the use of
both 26L and 26R as the prevailing runways to best avoid residential
areas

Adhere to all Long Beach Municipal Code (LBMC) Chapter 16.43
(Airport Noise Ordinance) regulations and Long Beach Airport
recommended noise abatement procedures related to pattern
and flight training.

Reminder – Touch and Go operations are not permitted after 7 pm
weekly and 3 pm on the weekends and Holidays.

As a recommendation- No pattern work on any runway after
10 pm- including required full stop and taxi back operations.

For any pattern work necessary after 10 pm, use a right hand pattern
on the only active runway (30/12) so to mitigate impacts to residential
neighborhoods

Aircraft should try to touch down in normal touchdown zone to
maximize the usable distance of the runway with appropriate
flight profiles.
Limit the width of the downwind leg to no more than ½ to one mile
from runway centerlines of Runway 08L/26R and
Runway 08R/26L use visual cues
Aligning Downwind to Carson St., to north on
Runway 08L/26R
Aligning Downwind to Willow St. to the south on
Runway 08R/26L

Distribute flight activity based on demand and optimize the use of
both 26L and 26R as the prevailing runways to best avoid residential
areas.

Adhere to all Long Beach Municipal Code (LBMC) Chapter 16.43
(Airport Noise Ordinance) regulations and Long Beach Airport
recommended noise abatement procedures related to pattern
and flight training.

Reminder – Touch and Go operations are not permitted after 7 pm
weekly and 3 pm on the weekends and Holidays.

As a recommendation: No pattern work on any runway after
10 pm- including required full stop and taxi back operations.

For any pattern work necessary after 10 pm, use a right hand pattern
on the only active runway (30/12) so to mitigate impacts to residential

neighborhoods
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
NEW PROPOSED FFPP

Fly A Friendly Pattern Program

These procedures are voluntary, and not mandatory. Do not attempt to follow any of these voluntary noise abatement procedures if any procedure compromises safety and performance of your aircraft.

Use full length of Runway, and full power on all departures.

Use Best Efforts to Maximize Climb after takeoff.

Fly appropriate pattern altitudes.
When able, implement crosswind turns at the highest altitude possible on departure, using 700’ as a reference.

Ask for an early crosswind turn from the tower at a lower altitude if desired.
Fly the upwind leg to 1000’ MSL on departure before turning crosswind/downwind, depending on ATC instructions.
Limit the width of the downwind leg to no more than ½ to one mile from runway centerlines of Runway 08L/26R and Runway 08R/26L use visual cues
Aligning Downwind to Carson St., to north on Runway 08L/26R, Aligning Downwind to Willow St. to the south on Runway 08R/26L

Aircraft should try to touch down in the normal touchdown zone to
maximize the usable distance of the runway with appropriate
flight profiles.  If a touch and go is attempted, and you land further down the runway, use full stop taxi back procedures to minimize noise.

Distribute flight activity based on demand and optimize the use of
both 26L and 26R as the prevailing runways to best avoid residential
areas. (3) This is dependent on ATC instructions/ operations.

Adhere to all Long Beach Municipal Code (LBMC) Chapter 16.43
(Airport Noise Ordinance) regulations and Long Beach Airport
recommended noise abatement procedures related to pattern
and flight training:

Touch and Go, Stop and Go, Practice Low Approach, and VFR Practice Missed Approach can be conducted at the Airport between 7am and 7pm on weekdays and between 8am and 3pm on Saturdays, Sundays, New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. If any such holiday falls on Saturday or Sunday and, as a result, a holiday is observed on the preceding Friday or succeeding Monday, then such Friday or Monday, as the case may be, shall be considered to be a holiday for that purpose.

As a recommendation- No pattern work on any runway after
10 pm- including required full stop and taxi back operations.

If a departure is required before 7am and after 10pm, VFR departures should contain their climb to climbing turns, gaining as much altitude as possible within the confines of the airport property to reduce noise in the neighborhoods.
____________________________________________________
Regards, John Ringel, KLGB ANAC

 

Torrance Airport Update:    Posted: 05/14/2024

  • The Airport Commission (which is an advisory body for the city council) is being suspended due to a perceived breach of the brown act.  Jim Gates asked the commission to aid his request for answers regarding the landing light outage.  The commission had an agenda item to "accept and file" a report on the lights.  The commission believed that trying to answer the questions posed was within the scope of the agenda and asked the city staff liaison (Gerry Pinela) for advice.  That advice was to seek a meeting with the city council to request an answer.  The commission then passed a motion to have a meeting with council members to seek answers.  The city council saw that as passing a motion for a non-agendized item that violates the Brown Act.
  • Because of that, the city council approved a motion to suspend the airport commission for 3 months, placing any necessary responsibilities under the transportation committee.  The chair of the transport committee is a real estate developer and city council person, Mattucci.
  • At the 7-May council meeting where this happened, the only new member voted in during the March election stated that he believed the airport commission chair (Anne Minder) being a pilot and member of TAA was biased and not operating in the best interest of the city, so while he was not sure of the Brown Act violation, he supported a suspension to determine the path forward.
  • Interestingly, the leader of COTAR (the resident group seeking the reform of TOA and driving excuse for the city to take all the sanctions that have been taken), Chuck Costello, said that he wanted the airport commission to continue.
  • Anne Minder has resigned as chair of the commission.
  • On the brighter side we (TAA) are creating a community outreach pancake breakfast for local residents and pilots (not intended as a fly-in).  On 15-June 8 am-noon.
  • We have also begun to engage the Chamber of Commerce and are working on ideas of "how we can help businesses grow".
  • Also contacted the city's economic development office to see how to advertise Torrance as a destination more accessible because of the airport.
  • Discussing how to engage local hotels in a "come to Torrance" via GA campaign
  • We seem to lack the power to affect more than ideas...

--

Blue Skies,

Gary Palmer, CFI-SEL, CPL-SEL, AGI, IGI

Torrance, CA

Webmaster Note:  Gary is a talented instructor, a motivated airport advocate, and a fine pilot who is genuinely interested in his community for all the right reasons.  Gary is a member of TAA and of SCAUWG.

 

G100UL Maker Refutes NATA Claim That It’s Not Ready To Sell  - "Vitol Aviation, which has more than a million gallons of General Aviation Modifications Inc. (GAMI) G100UL unleaded avgas for sale, is disputing claims by the National Air Transportation that the fuel is not ready to be sold. In a statement last week, NATA said that without a fuel specification from ASTM International, which GAMI has chosen not to pursue, fuel suppliers and retailers “lack assurances that the unleaded fuel they are selling will not expose them to liability” and the fuel therefore cannot be considered “commercially available.” But Vitol says it has had no problem getting insurance for its handling of G100UL, the fuel has been fully tested and vetted and it fully intends to bring it to market."  Full Comment Here.

 

NATA’s Hard Line Complicates Fuel Quest - "The National Air Transportation Association (NATA) has laid all its cards on the table. We now know why it thinks General Aviation Modifications Inc.’s G100UL unleaded fuel is clearly considered an outlier in the quest for a new drop-in replacement for 100LL even though it has been approved by the FAA via a universal STC for gas engines in certified airplanes (the helicopter process is underway). - According to a statement from NATA, the STC, which in FAA circles is an immensely powerful document, is nothing more than “a positive step” toward..."  Full Article Here.

 

AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE: DO YOU REALLY NEED A COMPASS? - Federal Aviation Administration regulations state that an aircraft operated under visual flight rules must have a "magnetic direction indicator." Does that have to be a compass? - “For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong.” - H.L. Mencken. - That’s exactly where I found myself when pondering the question, “Do I need to put a compass in the Titan T-51D Mustang that I’m building?” - Full Story: AOPA Online

 

Common Scam Types - Useful Info for Pilots and Everyone reprinted here from Capitol One for a common Good  - 

Payment scams

Be wary if you are urged to make a purchase with the promise of compensation, or if someone offers to make a payment for you, or provides you with bank account info with which to make a payment. If something sounds too good to be true, it probably is. If you use a payment method you are not familiar with, you run the risk of ultimately being held responsible for the amount paid.

Employment scams

Be vigilant in validating employment opportunities, especially when exclusively online or working from home. Be suspicious if someone claims to have overpaid you for a job, promises to reimburse for equipment, or asks you to send equipment to an IT dept. The equipment may never be returned, and reimbursements or overpayments may be illegitimate, leaving you liable for the funds. Never divulge personal information online to an unreliable source or through deceptive job

Tech support scams

Tech support claims your computer has malware and requests payment to fix the defects or access your computer.

Impersonation scams

Scammers pose as a legitimate company (like Capital One) or a utility company and request personal information or a payment transfer in order to make things "right" on your account. They might also use a fake caller ID that could show up as a legit company's number and/ or request remote access to your device. Scammer posing as a utility company might warn you to pay your balance within a limited time or else the utility will be shut off.

Fake rental

A house is legitimately listed for sale online, but scammers have set up a fake website and listed the house as a rental. You send your first month’s deposit to a scammer pretending to be the landlord/owner.

Fake websites

Legitimate-looking websites are being created by scammers, and a quick Google search will lead you to a real-looking phone number. When you call, they’ll try to obtain your sign-in details or other information.

Overpayment scams

You receive an overpayment for an item you’re selling, immediately followed by a request to deposit the check (which turns out to be a bad check) and then send the difference via a wire or gift card.

Check cashing

You’re approached outside a bank branch and asked to cash a check for someone who claims they don’t have an account or left their ID home. The bad check will be held against your account when it doesn’t clear.

Romance scams

If you are asked for financial support from a new partner in a relationship that’s been exclusively online, you’re likely a target of this elaborate scheme.

Charity scams

You receive a request to donate to a charity that you've never heard of and for which you can’t find an official website.

Debt relief

You receive a request for payment in order to establish a service relationship to pay, settle or get rid of debt.

FTC / IRS scams

Scam artists are pretending to be IRS officials to get your money. They'll call, email, or text you claiming you owe back taxes or there's a problem with your tax return. They even rig caller ID to make their call look official. They play on your fears.

Investment scams

You receive a request to invest in a business opportunity with promises of high returns and/or getting rich quickly.

Lottery scams

You receive a request to prepay fees or taxes in order to receive a large prize you supposedly won.

Grandparent scam

You receive a call or text message from someone claiming to be a grandchild or loved one asking for money to help with an emergency, plus instructions on where to send the funds.

Puppy scam

Scammers post fake litters online or pretend to be someone they're not (usually an existing breeder) to take advantage of puppy sales (sans the puppies.)

Online Merchant/Marketplace Scams

When responding to ads or interacting in marketplaces on social media, research sellers and products independently to ensure legitimacy. Notice the red flags like a high-ticket item for a price too-good-to-be-true or a buyer who “accidentally” overpaid you for an item or someone asking for personal information or redirecting to an unfamiliar/strange looking URL.

Mortgage closing

You receive an email or text message that looks similar to your real estate agent’s contact info that indicates there is a last minute change to the wiring instructions, and tells you to wire closing costs to a different account.

Business email compromise scams

You receive an email from your supplier/vendor requesting to send money to a different account. The supplier/vendor email appears to be familiar. But this could be a fraudster who obtained access to the network of your supplier/vendor

 

Flying Through Political Headwinds by Mike Jones - An Excerpt from Cessna Pilots Magazine June 2023 - "Which is exactly the relationship between our local airports and the governments that own them. Airports and politicians are symbiotes in the convoluted process of governance. Every airplane needs an airport. If you recall from Doug Tilghman’s epistles on airports published in this magazine at the beginning of this year, there are about 20,000 airports in the FAA registry. Only about 5,000 are public access airports, and 83% of those are owned by towns, cities or counties. As public facilities, those airports depend upon the largess of city managers, county commissioners and state representatives to deliver funding and grants, which are the “scraps of food” airports need to prosper and grow. Which leads to two very important questions for pilots like you and me. First, how does anybody get the attention of those busy decision makers? Second, lacking a suction cup on the top of my head, what does it take to get them to scatter some greenbacks in the direction of my airport? "  Read the Full Mike Jones Commentary Here.